Crime Trend Series: 25 Years of Uniform Crime Reports in Hawaii, 1975-1999

25 Years of Uniform Crime Reports in Hawaii, 1975-1999

February 22, 2001 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report comparing Hawaii and United States crime rates over the 25-year history of statewide annual reporting, from 1975-1999.

Hawaii’s overall violent crime rate and rates for individual violent offense categories (including murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) were consistently below the comparable U.S. rates in almost all years. The lone exception was forcible rape in 1982.

Hawaii’s overall property crime rate (based on reported burglaries, motor vehicle thefts, and larceny-thefts) was consistently higher than the respective U.S. rate. However, overall property crime rates in any jurisdiction are strongly influenced by the large number of larceny-thefts that are reported, and larceny-theft is the only offense that has had a consistently higher rate in Hawaii. Hawaii’s burglary rate has remained near the U.S. rate since 1980, and its motor vehicle theft rate was lower than the U.S. rate in most years since 1981.

Tracked separately from the other major offenses, Hawaii’s arson rate was lower than the U.S. rate in most years since 1983.

The report also summarizes the major decline in Hawaii’s crime rates, from near record highs in 1995 to record and near record lows in 1999. Attorney General Earl Anzai stated, “The decrease in crime during these 4 years was truly remarkable, and a credit to our communities and the criminal justice system.”

25 Years of Uniform Crime Reports in Hawaii, 1975-1999