Special Reports: 2003-2012 Release Dates

Reports arranged chronologically, newest at top

Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2011

March 27, 2012 – The Department of the Attorney General released its annual report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2011.

A record high total of 15,375 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2011, marking a substantial, 20.1% increase from the previous record high of 12,801 applications processed in 2010. Of the applications processed in 2011, 94.0% were approved and resulted in issued permits; 4.5% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.5% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

The 14,460 permits issued statewide in 2011 cover a record high total of 36,804 firearms registered, marking a 17.2% increase from the 31,390 firearms registered in 2010. Just under half (17,949, or 48.8%) of the firearms registered during 2011 were imported from out-of-state, with the remainder (18,855, or 51.2%) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawaii).

Firearm registration activity increased dramatically over the course of the twelve years for which these data have been systematically compiled and reported. From 2000 through 2011, the number of permit applications processed annually climbed 136.9%, the number of firearms registered soared 170.3%, and the number of firearms imported surged 148.3%.

It is a misdemeanor in the State of Hawaii to provide falsified information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense. In 2011, falsified criminal and/or mental health information was provided in 74.8% (172) of the 230 rejection cases; falsified information pertaining to anything other than criminal or mental health histories was provided in 3.5% (8) of the cases; both types of falsified information were provided in 0.4% (1) of the cases; and no falsified information was provided in 21.3% (49) of the cases.


Motor Vehicle Theft and Burglary in Hawaii: A Statistical Profile of Adult Offenders and Criminal Convictions

February 23, 2012 – This study report, prepared in partnership between the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Chaminade University of Honolulu, and the Department of the Attorney General, examines the records of 370 adult criminal offenders in the State of Hawaii, who were convicted on a total of 508 burglary and/or motor vehicle theft charges during Calendar Year 2010. The specific charges include Burglary in the first and second degree (HRS §708-810 and §708-811, respectively) and Unauthorized Control of a Propelled Vehicle (HRS §708-836). Data from the Hawaii Criminal Justice Data Center and the Crime Prevention and Justice Assistance Division, both within the Department of the Attorney General, were used to analyze these offenders and offenses.

Highlights from the study include:

The Offenses

During CY 2010 in the State of Hawaii, a total of 370 individuals were convicted on a total of 186 counts of burglary in the first degree, 96 counts of burglary in the second degree, and 226 counts of unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle.

There were statistically significant county-level differences in offense types, whereby Hawaii County had proportionally more convictions for burglaries in the first degree (54.6%), Kauai County had more burglaries in the second degree (31.8%), and the City & County of Honolulu had the highest percentage of unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle (53.9%).

The Offenders

The majority of offenders were male (87.3%). Females were represented most strongly in the unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle category, accounting for 14.9% of the convicted offenders.

Almost two-thirds of the offenders were either Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian (37.5%) or White (23.9%). There were no statistically significant racial/ethnic differences when examining offense type.

The average age of the offenders was 30 years old.

The offenders’ criminal history records show an average of 25.1 total arrests per offender for all offense types, including 9.9 felony arrests, with 4.2 felony convictions, 3.2 misdemeanor convictions, and 2.1 petty misdemeanor convictions.

Based on Level of Service Inventory-Revised assessments of criminogenic risks and needs, the offenders in the study population are on average classified as being at high risk for criminal recidivism (i.e., they are very likely to commit new crimes).

Case Processing and Sentencing

The average time elapsed between arrest and conviction for all offenders was 412 days. There were no statistically significant differences in time between arrest and conviction by offense type or by county, although the City & County of Honolulu exhibited the longest period between arrest and conviction, with an average of 424 days, while Maui County had the shortest, with an average of 328 days.

The modal sentence for these offenders was probation with some jail time. Based upon offense type, there were no statistically significant differences in the likelihood of being sentenced to a prison term.

Offenders who were sentenced to prison terms averaged significantly more total prior arrests and convictions for felonies, misdemeanors, and petty misdemeanors than did offenders who were sentenced to probation.

Offenders who were assessed at higher risk levels for criminal recidivism were significantly more likely to receive either a mixed jail/probation sentence or prison term than straight probation without any sort of incarceration.

Also included in the study report are tips on preventing burglaries and motor vehicle thefts.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2011

February 15, 2012 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2011 is the tenth annual publication and covers hate crime cases disposed during Calendar Year 2011.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2010. The report also features ten-year trend statistics.


Crime & Justice in Hawaii: 2010 Household Survey Report

 

August 30, 2011 – The Hawaii Department of the Attorney General published its annual statewide survey of crime victimization and related concerns. The results, published in Crime & Justice in Hawaii, offer a unique view of the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii during Calendar Year 2010, thus providing important information to criminal justice agencies, lawmakers, researchers and service providers, and the general public. The survey aims at assessing the fear of crime, crime awareness and perceptions, security measures taken, victimization during the prior year, and knowledge and utilization of victim assistance resources. The survey report also presents results via the use of county maps depicting police beat districts.

Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2010

March 31, 2011 – The Department of the Attorney General released its annual report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2010.

A record high total of 12,801 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2010, marking a 1.5% increase from the previous record high of 12,606 applications processed in 2009. Of the applications processed in 2010, 95.4% were approved and resulted in issued permits; 3.6% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.0% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

The 12,214 permits issued statewide in 2010 cover a total of 31,390 firearms registered, marking a 6.8% decrease from the record high tally of 33,678 firearms registered in 2009. Just under half (15,212, or 48.5%) of the firearms registered during 2010 were imported from out-of-state, with the remainder (16,178, or 51.5%) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawaii).

Firearm registration activity increased dramatically over the course of the eleven years for which these data have been systematically compiled and reported. From 2000 through 2010, the number of permit applications processed annually increased 97.3%, the number of firearms registered surged 130.5%, and the number of firearms imported rose 110.5%.

The vast majority of rejections in Hawaii during 2010 were for longarm (110, or 89.4%) rather than handgun (13, or 10.6%) permit applications. Following a trend since this annual report was first published, longarm permit applications in 2010 were rejected at a rate that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (1.4% for longarm permit applications versus 0.3% for handgun permit applications).

It is a misdemeanor in the State of Hawaii to provide falsified information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense. In 2010, falsified criminal and/or mental health information was provided in 64.2% (79) of the 134 rejection cases; falsified information pertaining to anything other than criminal or mental health histories was provided in 3.3% (4) of the cases; and no falsified information was provided in 32.5% (40) of the cases.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2010

February 22, 2011 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2010 is the ninth annual publication and covers hate crime cases disposed during Calendar Year 2010.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2010. The report also features nine-year trend statistics.


Hawaii’s Imprisonment Policy and the Performance of Parolees Who Were Incarcerated In-State and on the Mainland

January 13, 2011 – This study report was completed in partnership with the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and examines the records of 660 criminal offenders in the State of Hawaii who were released to parole from either public/in-state prisons or private/mainland prisons during Fiscal Year 2006. The parolees were statistically tracked for three years. The study’s principal finding is that the difference in recidivism rates for the public/in-state cohort (56 percent) and the private/mainland cohort (53 percent) is statistically insignificant. The report also presents a statistical portrait of both cohorts (e.g., criminal history, risk assessments, demographics), and provides an overview of the history, policies, national context, and costs relating to the State of Hawaii’s use of private, out-of-state correctional facilities.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2009

April 13, 2010 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2009 is the eighth annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2009.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2009. The report also features eight-year trend statistics.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2009

April 7, 2010 – The Department of the Attorney General released its annual report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2009.

A record high total of 12,606 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2009, marking a major, 19.7% increase from the previous record high of 10,527 applications processed in 2008. Of the applications processed in 2009, 95.1% were approved and resulted in issued permits; 3.8% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.1% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

The 11,992 permits issued statewide in 2009 cover a record high total of 33,678 firearms registered, outpacing by 29.6% the previous record high of 25,996 firearms registered in 2008. Just over half (16,897, or 50.2%) of the firearms registered during 2009 were imported from out-of-state, with the remainder (16,781, or 49.8%) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawaii).

Firearm registration activity increased dramatically over the course of the decade for which these data have been systematically compiled and reported (see Figure 4).  From 2000 through 2009, the number of permit applications processed annually increased 94.3%, the number of firearms registered surged 147.3%, and the number of firearms imported rose 133.8%.

The vast majority of rejections in Hawaii during 2009 were for longarm (112, or 83.6%) rather than handgun (22, or 16.4%) permit applications. Following a trend since this annual report was first published, longarm permit applications in 2009 were rejected at a rate that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (1.5% for longarm permit applications versus 0.4% for handgun permit applications).

It is a misdemeanor in the State of Hawaii to provide falsified information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense (HRS §134-17). In 2009, falsified criminal and/or mental health information was provided in 68.4% (91) of the 134 rejection cases; falsified information pertaining to anything other than criminal or mental health histories was provided in 2.3% (3) of the cases; and no falsified information was provided in 29.3% (39) of the cases.


Identity Theft in Hawaii, 2008

 

October 30, 2009 – Act 140, Session Laws of Hawaii 2006, required the Department of the Attorney General to develop a statewide identity theft tracking program. Data derived from the program are herein reported for Calendar Year 2008 and are the focus of the first publication of Identity Theft in Hawaii.  Presented are statistics on identity theft incidents reported to Hawaii’s four county police departments during 2008, and on identity theft arrests made by those same agencies throughout the year.


Crime & Justice in Hawaii:  2008 Household Survey Report

 

September 23, 2009 – The Hawaii Department of the Attorney General published its annual statewide survey of crime victimization and related concerns.  The results, published in Crime & Justice in Hawaii, offer a unique view of the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii during Calendar Year 2008, thus providing important information to criminal justice agencies, lawmakers, researchers and service providers, and the general public.  The survey aims at assessing the fear of crime, crime awareness and perceptions, security measures taken, victimization during the prior year, and knowledge and utilization of victim assistance resources.  The survey report also presents results via the use of county maps depicting police beat districts.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2008

June 4, 2009 – The Department of the Attorney General released its annual report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2008.

A record high total of 10,527 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2008, marking a substantial, 19.6% increase from the 8,835 applications processed in 2007. Of the applications processed in 2008, 94.3% were approved and resulted in issued permits; 4.7% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.1% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.  For comparison, the most current national data show a 2.0% rejection rate for all state and local agencies conducting background checks in 2007.

The 9,923 permits issued statewide in 2008 cover a record high total of 25,996 firearms registered.  Just under half (11,978, or 46.1%) of the firearms registered during 2008 were imported from out-of-state, with the majority (14,108, or 53.9%) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawaii).

Firearm registration activity increased considerably over the nine-year period in which these data have been systematically compiled and reported (see Figure 4).  From 2000 through 2008, the number of permit applications processed increased 62.2%, the number of firearms registered surged 90.9%, and the number of firearms imported rose 65.7%.

The vast majority of rejections in Hawaii during 2008 were for longarm (95, or 84.8%) rather than handgun (17, or 15.2%) permit applications. Following a trend since this annual report was first published, longarm permit applications in 2008 were rejected at a rate that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (1.6% for longarm permit applications versus 0.4% for handgun permit applications).

It is a misdemeanor in the State of Hawaii to provide falsified information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense (HRS §134-17). In 2008, falsified criminal and/or mental health information was provided in 59.8% (67) of the 112 rejection cases; falsified information pertaining to anything other than criminal or mental health histories was provided in 3.6% (4) of the cases; and no falsified information was provided in 35.7% (40) of the cases.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2008

May 21, 2009 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2008 is the seventh annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2008.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2008. The report also features seven-year trend statistics.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2007

March 17, 2008 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2007 is the sixth annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2007.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2007. The report also features six-year trend statistics.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2007

 

March 13, 2008 – The Department of the Attorney General released its annual report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2007.

A record high total of 8,835 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2007, marking a 9.8 percent increase from the previous record high of 8,049 applications processed in 2006.  Of the applications processed in 2007, 94.2 percent were approved and resulted in issued permits; a record high of 4.8 percent were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and a record low of 0.9 percent were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.  For comparison, the most current national data show a 2.4 percent rejection rate for all state and local agencies conducting background checks in 2003.

The 8,326 permits issued statewide in 2007 cover a record high total of 21,784 firearms registered.  Just under half (10,401, or 47.7 percent) of the firearms registered during 2007 were imported from out-of-state, with the remainder (11,383, or 52.3 percent) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawai‘i).

Firearm registration activity increased considerably over the eight-year period in which these data have been compiled and reported.  From 2000 through 2007, the number of permit applications processed increased 36.2 percent, the number of firearms registered surged 60.0%, and the number of firearms imported rose 43.9 percent.

The vast majority of the 83 rejections in Hawai‘i during 2007 were for longarm (70, or 84.3 percent) rather than handgun (13, or 15.7 percent) permit applications.  Following a trend since this annual report was first published, longarm permit applications in 2007 were rejected at a rate that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (1.4 percent for longarm permit applications versus 0.3 percent for handgun permit applications).

It is a misdemeanor in the State of Hawai‘i to provide falsified information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense (HRS §134-17).  In 2007, falsified criminal and/or mental health information was provided in 61.4 percent (51) of the 83 rejection cases; falsified information pertaining to anything other than criminal or mental health histories was provided in 9.6 percent (8) of the cases; and no falsified information was provided in 28.9 percent (24) of the cases.

Roughly three-fifths (49, or 59.0 percent) of the rejections in 2007 were due to applicants’ prior criminal convictions, while 10.8 percent (9) were due to pending criminal cases.  The remaining 30.1 percent (25) of rejections in 2007 were not based on the criminal histories of the applicants.


An Analysis of Youth Level of Service Inventory (YLSI) “Risks and Needs” Data for Juvenile Offenders Assessed by Hawaii’s Second & Third Circuit Family Courts and at the Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility, 2001–2006

January 10, 2008 – The Youth Level of Service Inventory (YLSI) is an assessment instrument used by juvenile justice professionals to measure juvenile offenders’ “risks and needs” with regard to various criminogenic factors, such as offense history, family circumstances, educational/vocational skills or deficiencies, substance abuse, etc.  YLSI data provide objective, valid information that is useful for determining the appropriate types and levels of case supervision and treatment/intervention procedures to use with individual juvenile offenders.  The YLSI is also useful for identifying the risk of re-offending, so that limited resources can be directed to the offenders who are most in need of services and close supervision.  At the time the data were compiled for this study, the YLSI was used in Hawaii by the Second Circuit Family Court (serving the islands of Maui, Molokai, and Lanai), the Third Circuit Family Court (serving the island of Hawaii), and the Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF).

The study data set is comprised of basic demographics and YLSI assessment scores for 521 unduplicated juvenile offenders who were assessed between August, 2001 and December, 2006. The study report is divided into three sections. The first section presents demographic and other descriptive statistics for the YLSI-assessed subpopulations from each of the three individual agencies. The second section examines data for a variety of YLSI Risk Scores and Risk Levels, by agency.  The third section focuses on probationers’ and HYCF wards’ average Risk Scores, by Circuit, gender, and age.


Crime & Justice in Hawaii:  2005 Household Survey Report

November 1, 2007 – In 1994, the State of Hawaii’s Department of the Attorney General conducted its first comprehensive survey of crime victimization in the state.  The results, published in Crime & Justice in Hawaii, 1994, provided a heretofore unexamined view of the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii during Calendar Year 1993.  That first survey provided useful information to criminal justice agencies, lawmakers, researchers and service providers, and helped to establish a baseline for trend studies.  Additional surveys were published annually through 1998, with each survey asking about respondents’ criminal victimization from the prior year, as well as their current concerns about crime-related issues.

After an eight-year hiatus, the Department of the Attorney General’s Crime Prevention and Justice Assistance (CPJA) Division recommenced its crime victimization survey in 2006.  The survey is an effort put forth to better understand the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii.  The survey was administered in mid-May of 2006 and covers crimes committed from January to December of 2005.  The survey aims at assessing fear of crime, crime awareness and perceptions, security measures taken, victimization during the prior year, and knowledge and utilization of victim assistance resources.  Several questions were added, deleted, or otherwise changed since this survey was last administered.  Some questions were added to decipher the public’s opinion about emergent national issues such as terrorism and identity theft, as well as more localized concerns, such as traffic.  In conjunction with funding sources for the victimization survey, questions were also added to assess the public’s knowledge and use of various resources that are available for victims of certain crimes.  The survey report also presents results via the use of county maps depicting police beat districts.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2006

April 30, 2007 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2006.

A total of 8,049 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed statewide during 2006, marking a 7.4% decrease from the record high of 8,695 applications processed in 2005. Of the applications processed in 2006, 94.7% were approved and resulted in issued permits; a record high of 4.3% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and a record low of 1.0% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

Firearm registration activity has increased considerably over the seven-year period in which these data have been systematically compiled and reported (see Figure 4).  From 2000 through 2006, the number of permit applications processed increased 24.0%, the number of firearms registered surged 46.7%, and the number of firearms imported rose 36.0%.

The 7,623 permits that were approved and issued statewide in 2006 cover a record high total of 19,971 firearms registered. Just under half (9,830, or 49.2%) of the firearms registered during 2006 were imported from out-of-state, with the remainder (10,141, or 50.8%) accounted for by in-state transfers (i.e., firearms that were already in Hawaii).

The majority of rejections in Hawaii during 2006 were for longarm (62, or 80.5%) rather than handgun (15, or 19.5%) permit applications. Following a trend since this annual report was first published, longarm permit applications in 2006 were rejected at a rate that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (1.4% for longarm permit applications versus 0.4% for handgun permit applications).

Over half (42, or 54.5%) of the rejections in 2006 were due to applicants’ prior criminal convictions, while almost one-fifth (14, or 18.2%) were due to pending criminal cases. The remaining 27.3% (21) of rejections in 2006 were not based on the criminal histories of the applicants.

The complete report also presents data and related information on registration activity across counties; illegally falsified information provided by rejected applicants; categorical and specific reasons for rejected permit applications; and applications for licenses to carry open and/or concealed firearms in public.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2006

March 20, 2007 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2006 is the fifth annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2006.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2006. The report also features five-year trend statistics.


The Female Juvenile Offender in Hawaii

-and-

The Serious Juvenile Offender in Hawaii

July 11, 2006 – The Department of the Attorney General released two special study reports on juvenile offenders in Hawaii, and presented the research findings to an audience at the State Capitol.

The Female Juvenile Offender report examines gender differences in arrests, adjudications and social characteristics of juvenile offenders in Hawaii. The study also investigates gender differences in histories of abuse and neglect, exposure to domestic violence, psychological diagnoses, self-injury, suicidal ideation/attempts, academic failure, gang involvement, delinquent peer groups, and drug and alcohol use. Female and male juvenile offenders’ family backgrounds, including parental substance abuse and criminal histories, are also compared.

The Serious Juvenile Offender report presents analyses of similar factors that are predictive of status offending versus felony offending, and short-term detainment versus commitment to the Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility.

Profiles of the Female and Serious Juvenile Offender in Hawaii


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2005

July 6, 2006 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2005.

A total of 8,695 private/personal firearm permit applications were processed in Hawaii during 2005, marking a 27.1% increase since 2004 and setting a record high tally since the initiation of statewide statistics reporting in 2000. Of the applications processed in 2005, a record high rate of 95.9% (8,338) were approved and resulted in issued permits, 2.8% (247) were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period, and a record low rate of 1.3% (110) were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

Firearm registration activity in Hawaii has increased over the six-year period that these data have been compiled and reported. From 2000 to 2005, the number of processed applications increased 34.0%, the number of firearms registered increased 32.1%, and the number of firearms imported increased 18.5%.

The 8,695 permits issued in Hawaii during 2005 covered a total of 17,982 firearms registered, of which 42.7% (7,687) were rifles, 42.5% (7,650) were handguns, and 14.8% (2,645) were shotguns. Just under half (8,563, or 47.6%) of the firearms registered during 2005 were imported from out of state, with the remainder accounted for by in-state transfers.

The majority of the 110 permit application rejections in Hawaii during 2005 were for longarm (82.7%) rather than handgun (17.3%) permits. Following a six-year trend, longarm permit applications in 2005 were rejected at a rate (2.2%) that is several times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (0.4%).

In 2005, 39.1% (43) of the 110 rejections were not based on the criminal histories of the applicants, an equal proportion of 39.1% (43) were due to prior criminal convictions, and 21.8% (24) were due to pending criminal cases.

The complete report also presents data and related information on registration activity across counties, illegally falsified information provided by rejected applicants, categorical and specific reasons for rejected permit applications, and applications for licenses to carry.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2005

April 24, 2006 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. This report is the fourth annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2005.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2005.


Driving Under the Influence in the City & County of Honolulu

January 11, 2006 – This study report, prepared in partnership with the University of Hawaii-West Oahu, provides a statistical profile of DUI arrestees, case outcomes, collisions, and injuries, and also documents the policy-relevant concerns and recommendations of key local stakeholders. Included are descriptive statistics and crosstabulations examining the relationship between arrestee demographics, prior DUI and overall criminal histories, conviction rates, the likelihood of motor vehicle collisions and personal injuries, injury severity, and comparisons between arrestees who either consent or refuse to take Blood Alcohol Concentration tests.


Project Safe Neighborhoods in Hawaii: Crime Mapping Report

November 18, 2005 – The Research & Statistics Branch is Hawaii’s federally-designated research partner for Project Safe Neighborhoods, a nationwide effort to reduce firearm-related crime through the vigorous enforcement of existing federal laws, community outreach, and research and evaluation.

This “crime mapping” report uses Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies and methodologies to graphically depict the distribution of federal firearm offenses and offenders throughout Hawaii. The source data are derived from cases prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney in Hawaii under the nationwide Project Safe Neighborhoods effort.

  • Project Safe Neighborhoods in Hawaii: Crime Mapping Report
    Download the complete report. (5.2 MB/ 159 pp.) Note: This is a graphics-intensive file. The overall graphics quality was reduced significantly in order to make the file size more manageable for downloading, and thus differs from the print quality of the published hard copy report.

Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2004

May 31, 2005 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. This report is the third annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2004.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2004.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2004

May 16, 2005 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2004.

A total of 6,842 private/personal firearm permit applications were processed in Hawaii during 2004, marking a 0.7% increase since 2003. Of the applications processed in 2004, 95.0% (6,501) were approved and resulted in issued permits, 3.5% (237) were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period, and 1.5% (104) were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors. For comparison, the most current national data from the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics show a 1.9% rejection rate for all state and local agencies conducting background checks in 2003.

Firearm registration activity in Hawaii has increased over the five-year period that these data have been systematically compiled and reported. From 2000 to 2004, the number of processed applications increased 5.4%, the number of firearms registered increased 7.7%, and the number of firearms imported increased 5.1%.

The 6,842 permits issued in Hawaii during 2004 covered a total of 14,661 firearms registered, of which 43.8% (6,417) were rifles, 39.6% (5,810) were handguns, and 16.6% (2,432) were shotguns. Just over half (51.8%) of the firearms registered during 2004 were imported from out of state, with the remainder accounted for by in-state transfers. Although it is impossible to provide a precise tally of privately owned firearms in Hawaii, law enforcement estimates place the figure at approximately one million.

The vast majority of rejections in Hawaii during 2004 were for longarm (85.6%, or 89) rather than handgun (14.4%, or 15) permit applications. Following a five-year trend, longarm permit applications in 2004 were rejected at a rate almost five times higher than the rejection rate for handgun permit applications (2.3% for longarm permit applications versus 0.5% for handgun permit applications).

In 2004, the majority (54.8%, or 57) of the 104 rejections were not based on the criminal histories of the applicants, 38.5% (40) were due to prior criminal convictions, and 6.7% (7) were due to pending criminal cases.

The complete report also compares registration activity across counties and presents data on falsified information provided by applicants, firearm confiscations, applications for licenses to carry, and categorical and specific reasons for rejected permit applications.


Project Safe Neighborhoods in Hawaii: Year 1 Study Report

October 15, 2004 – The Research & Statistics Branch is Hawaii’s federally-designated research partner for Project Safe Neighborhoods, a nationwide effort to reduce firearm-related crime through the vigorous enforcement of existing federal laws, community outreach, and research and evaluation.

This report presents the research findings from the first year of PSN in Hawaii. Included are data and analyses on the nature and extent of firearm-related crime in Hawaii, the U.S. Attorney in Hawaii’s prosecution of PSN cases, firearm traces conducted by the BATF, state weapons offense cases, and selected local PSN case descriptions. Also included are listings of federal and state weapons statutes, and project recommendations for Hawaii’s PSN Task Force.


Effects of Tourism on Rates of Serious Crimes in Hawaii

May 14, 2004 – This study reviews literature on the effects of tourism on crime in Hawaii and elsewhere. It analyzes Hawaii statistics — for the period from 1975 though 2002 — on rates of serious crime (i.e., UCR offenses), on tourism, and on other possible causes of crime. The study also compares Hawaii crime rates to national crime rates for the same period, and notes how the computation of crime rates would be affected each year if the presence of tourists were taken into account.

The report was originally prepared by John M. Knox & Associates, Inc., a Honolulu socio-economic research consultant, as one chapter in a larger socio-cultural impact report for the project “Planning for Sustainable Tourism in Hawai`i” (commissioned by the Hawai`i State Dept. of Business, Economic Development, & Tourism). The Department of the Attorney General asked Knox & Associates to repackage the crime chapter as a stand-alone report.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2003

April 26, 2004 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. This report is the second annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2003.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2003.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2003

April 7, 2004 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2003.

A total of 6,792 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed in Hawaii during 2003, marking a 2.8% decrease from 2002. Of the applications processed in 2003, 94.5% (6,417) were approved and resulted in issued permits; 3.8% (261) were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.7% (114) were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors.

Hawaii’s 1.7% rejection rate compares favorably with the 2.1% figure reported for all state and local agencies conducting background checks for firearm permits and transfers in 2002. That Hawaii’s rejection rate is lower than the national figure is especially noteworthy when Hawaii’s comparatively exhaustive background check procedures and extensive list of disqualifying factors are taken into consideration.

The 6,417 permits issued in Hawaii during 2003 covered a total of 14,924 firearms registered, of which 6,167 (41.3%) were handguns, 6,168 (41.3%) were rifles, and 2,589 (17.3%) were shotguns. Roughly half (46.9%) of the firearms registered during 2003 were imported from out of state, with the remainder accounted for by in-state transfers. Although it is impossible to provide an exact tally of privately owned firearms in Hawaii, law enforcement estimates place the figure at over one million.

As compared to Hawaii’s resident population distribution, firearm registration activity occurred disproportionately across the four counties during 2003. Based on its population size, 13% fewer permit applications were processed in the City & County of Honolulu than would be expected, and 49% fewer rejections were reported. Hawaii County recorded a 67% larger-than-expected share of processed applications and a 150% larger portion of rejections. Maui County processed applications proportionately to its population size, but its share of rejections was 164% larger than expected. Kauai County reported slightly more processed applications and slightly fewer rejections than would be anticipated based on population size.

Up from 24.3% (25 of 103) in 2002, 36.8% (42 of 114) of the rejections in 2003 were due to applicants’ prior criminal convictions, while 2.6% (3) were due to pending criminal cases. However, the majority (60.5%, or 69) of rejections in 2003 were not based on the criminal histories of the applicants. The report provides the full breakdown of broad categorical data on the reasons for rejected permit applications.

The most common specific reason for rejections in 2003 was, by far, a court-ordered alcohol abuse assessment following a conviction for driving under the influence, which the police departments interpret as a form of mental health treatment and thus grounds for rejection (a DUI conviction is not in and of itself a disqualifying factor). These cases comprised 15.8% (18) of all rejections.

It is a misdemeanor in Hawaii to provide false information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense. In 2003, falsified criminal or mental health information was provided in 71.9% (82) of the 114 rejection cases; falsified information not pertaining to criminal or mental health histories was provided in 3.5% (4); and no false information was provided in 24.6% (28) of the cases.


Drug Arrests per Capita, by County State of Hawaii, 1992-2002

March 24, 2003 – This chart shows total drug-related arrests per capita, by county, in the State of Hawaii during the 1992-2002 period. These data, which include arrests of adults and juveniles for drug manufacturing, sale, and possession, show a gradually declining trend for the City & County of Honolulu; general declines for Hawaii County and Maui County since the State’s record high overall crime rates of 1995-96, and a relatively stable trend for Kauai County since a sharp increase in the earliest years of the study period.

The chart also shows that Hawaii County and Maui County consistently reported the highest drug arrest rates throughout the study period, with Kauai County squarely in the middle, while the City & County of Honolulu reported the lowest rates. However, the most current data (2002) show that the gap between Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai Counties has tightened considerably.

The City & County of Honolulu, Hawaii County, Maui County, and Kauai County comprise approximately 75%, 12%, 11%, and 5% of the state population, respectively.

The data for the chart were compiled from annual Uniform Crime Reports, which are available in their entirety elsewhere on this web site.


Sexual Assault Victims in Honolulu: A Statistical Profile

February 27, 2004 – Prepared in partnership with staff from the Sex Abuse Treatment Center (SATC) in Honolulu, this report examines a database on sexual assault victims that received SATC services during the 1990-2001 period. Largely descriptive in nature, the report provides statistical data on victim and assault characteristics, police reporting, and trends. The report also examines the role of pre-assault alcohol use, and offers general recommendations for enhancing the SATC database.


Crime Mapping Applications for Hawaii’s Juvenile Justice Information System

September 26, 2003 – Crime mapping and the spatial analysis of crime, through the application of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, can prove invaluable to needs and assets assessment, policy design, resource allocation, strategic planning, and the evaluation of outcomes and effectiveness. This report is the result of a yearlong study conducted through a partnership between the Department of the Attorney General and the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s Department of Urban and Regional Planning. The objectives of the report are to demonstrate the policy-relevant applicability of both crime mapping and Hawai`i’s Juvenile Justice Information System (JJIS), a collaborative data exchange network that spans the continuum of police, prosecutors, Family Court, and corrections. It is hoped that this report will spark creative ideas as to how both GIS and the JJIS can become increasingly useful to agencies involved in juvenile justice administration and youth services in Hawai`i. The report provides an introduction to crime mapping along with specific illustrations based on JJIS data.


Hate Crimes in Hawaii, 2002

April 11, 2003 – Hawaii Revised Statutes §846-51 through -54 require the Department of the Attorney General to develop, direct, and report annually on a statewide hate crime statistics reporting program. With input and assistance from Hawaii’s police departments and prosecutors, the program was developed during the fall of 2001 and officially launched on January 1, 2002. This report is the first annual publication and covers Calendar Year 2002.

Featured in the report is information on the background, definitions, and characteristics of hate crimes and hate crime statistics reporting, and data on hate crimes that were reported to the Hawaii program during 2002.


Firearm Registrations in Hawaii, 2002

February 26, 2003 – The Department of the Attorney General released a special report detailing state firearm registration statistics for Calendar Year 2002.

A total of 6,990 personal/private firearm permit applications were processed in Hawaii during 2002, marking a 2.4% increase from 2001 and up 7.7% since 2000. Of the applications processed in 2002, 95.1% were approved and resulted in issued permits; 3.4% were approved but subsequently voided after the applicants failed to return for their permits within a specified time period; and 1.5% were rejected due to one or more disqualifying factors. The proportion of rejections fell by one-quarter in 2002, down from 2.0% reported for 2001.

The 6,990 permits issued in 2002 cover a total of 15,822 firearms registered, resulting in a 10.6% increase over the number of firearms registered in 2001 and up 16.2% since 2000. Roughly half (46.9%) of the firearms registered in 2002 were imported from out of state, with the remainder accounted for by in-state transfers.

As compared to Hawaii’s resident population distribution, firearm registration activity occurred disproportionately across the four counties during 2002. Based on its population size, approximately 13% fewer permit applications were processed in the City & County of Honolulu than would be expected, and 64% fewer rejections were recorded. Hawaii County reported a 42% larger-than-expected share of processed applications and a 166% larger portion of rejections. Maui County processed applications proportionally to its population size, but its share of rejections was 236% larger than expected. Kauai County accounted for 60% more processed applications than anticipated, but rejected 20% fewer applications.

Longarms (rifles and shotguns) accounted for 57.4% (9,076) of all firearms registered in 2002; the remaining 45.1% (6,746) of registered firearms were handguns. Almost seven times as many longarm permit applications (90, or 1.3%) than handgun permit applications (13, or 0.2%) were rejected for cause.

Hawaii’s 1.5% rejection rate compares favorably with the 2.3% figure reported for all state and local agencies conducting background checks for firearm permits and transfers in 2001. That Hawaii’s rejection rate is approximately one-third smaller than the national figure is especially noteworthy when Hawaii’s comparatively exhaustive background check procedures and extensive list of disqualifying factors are taken into consideration.

Down by more than half in 2002, 24.3% (25) of the rejections were due to the applicants’ prior criminal convictions, while 4.9% (5) arose from current indictments or otherwise pending cases. The majority (70.9%, or 73) of rejections in 2002 were not based on the criminal history of the applicants. The full report presents categorical data on the reasons for rejected permit applications.

The most common specific reason for rejections in 2002 was, by far, court-ordered alcohol abuse assessment following a conviction for drunk driving, which is interpreted as a form of mental health treatment and thus grounds for rejection (a DUI conviction is not in and of itself a disqualifying factor). These cases comprised 20.4% (21) of all rejections, not including three other DUI-related cases that also involved other disqualifying factors.

Applicants who are rejected on the basis on mental health histories can successfully reapply for firearm permits by producing a doctor’s letter that states the applicant is no longer adversely affected.

It is a misdemeanor in Hawaii to provide false information on firearm permit applications, unless the falsified information pertains to criminal or mental health histories, in which case it is a felony offense. In 2002, falsified criminal or mental health information was provided in 71.8% (74) of the 103 rejection cases; falsified information not pertaining to criminal or mental health histories was provided in 4.9% (5); and no false information was provided in 23.3% (24) of the cases.